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Top 10 2000s Shows You Forgot Were Awesome

VO: Rebecca Brayton
Top 10 2000s Shows You Forgot Were Awesome It’s time to dust the cobwebs off these series. Welcome to WatchMojo.com and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 2000s shows you forgot were awesome. For this list, we’ll be looking at shows that aired primarily in the 2000s, but we will be considering shows that touched down with a season or two in either the ‘90s, or 2010s. Of course, what matters most, is that these shows were great, and have been largely forgotten far too quickly.
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It’s time to dust the cobwebs off these series. Welcome to WatchMojo.com and today we’ll be counting down our picks for the top 10 2000s shows you forgot were awesome.



For this list, we’ll be looking at shows that aired primarily in the 2000s, but we will be considering shows that touched down with a season or two in either the ‘90s, or 2010s. Of course, what matters most, is that these shows were great, and have been largely forgotten far too quickly.



#10: “Dark Angel” (2000-02)


This ambitious cult classic created by James Cameron and featuring Jessica Alba in a breakout role captured viewers’ attention with its cyberpunk setting and strong female lead. Alba played a genetically engineered super soldier, part of project Manticore, created by the US government prior to a terrorist cyber-attack that crippled the country. The series follows Alba’s character, Max, as she attempts to reconnect with her genetically altered brothers and sisters while being hunted by the secret organization that created her. Sadly, Dark Angel aired on Fox, and it became one of the many cult classics to be canceled by the network before its time.



#9: “What I Like About You” (2002-06)


This show centered on Holly, a quirky teenager, and the uptight older Val, two estranged sisters forced to live together in New York City. With a colorful cast of friends and loved ones, the lovable and relatable characters were one of this show’s biggest draws. Despite the show’s steady ratings, the WB, the network it aired on, was failing and ultimately merged with UPN. Only a handful of shows from each network carried over to the new station, christened the CW, and sadly “What I Like About You” was one of the merger’s casualties.



#8: “Boston Legal” (2004-08)


The final season of the popular legal drama “The Practice,” introduced Alan Shore and a number of his associates at the firm of Crane, Poole & Schmidt. After the end of “The Practice” the members of Crane, Poole & Schmidt received their own spinoff, with both James Spader and William Shatner returning as Shore and his partner Denny Crane, respectively. Much to the delight of viewers, the show didn’t shy away from fourth wall breaks and Star Trek references. The legal drama won acclaim and viewers for its quick wit, doing well in the coveted 18-24 demographic, reaching a hundred episodes and earning multiple Emmy awards.



#7: “Nip/Tuck” (2003-10)


Filled with bloody surgeries, sex-addicted characters, and more vanity than you could shake a scalpel at, “Nip/Tuck” proved to be an on-point commentary about humanity’s worst and most basic impulses - dressed up as a sexy drama. Unlike other medical shows, which have generally focused on doctors who save lives, this FX series fixated on plastic surgeons. Dr. Sean McNamara and Dr. Christian Troy were both dark, troubled, and their personal lives were oh so very watchable. Of course, helping it stand out in the genre was its decision not to focus on episodic plots, but season long story arcs. It ended in 2010, but is still worth a watch today.



#6: “Kyle XY” (2006-09)


When this sci-fi/high school drama premiered, it became the highest rated show in ABC Family Network’s history. “Kyle XY” began with the discovery of a strange boy in the woods, with no memory, no clothes, and most puzzling of all, no belly button. Despite his hyper intelligence and ability to learn almost anything incredibly quickly, Kyle’s social skills were slow to develop and he had a difficult time adapting to high school and navigating social relationships, including new adoptive siblings and his first crush. Unfortunately, a dip in ratings saw it cancelled after three seasons. Few people remember it now, but in its heyday, it was a big deal, and worthy of the hype.



#5: “X-Men: Evolution” (2000-03)


While other X-Men shows have stuck in the public memory, this one from the 2000s, despite earning critical praise, has somewhat been forgotten among casual fans. What a travesty! The show updated the team for the new millennium, recasting many of the heroes as teens attending Xavier’s school, and updated them to reflect modern attitudes and social issues. While it was influenced by contemporary sources, such as the X-Men films and Ultimate universe, it also became influential in its own right. It inspired other X-men media in terms of theme and style, and introduced original characters, most notably the young female clone of Wolverine, X-23.



#4: “The Weekenders” (2000-04)


This Saturday morning cartoon followed four middle school friends on their weekend adventures. The diverse characters included a relatable cast; the tomboyish and brave Lor, the stylish and cool Carver, the nerdy vegetarian Tish, and of course, the leader of the group, the wacky Tino. With its well-written characters, strong relationships and interesting plot lines, it proved very popular. Though this should have guaranteed its legacy, it’s not remembered as well as other cartoons of the era. It did a bit of Network hopping within the Disney family, which may have played a factor, but seriously, given that it was once dubbed "the show that killed Pokémon," “The Weekenders” should NOT be forgotten.



#3: “Monk” (2002-09)


Airing on the USA Network, Monk became arguably the most watched network TV show of the decade. Equal parts comedy and drama, it followed Adrian Monk, a detective with Sherlock Holmes level talent but a laundry list of compulsions and phobias. His strange attitude, both hilarious and tragic, and many, many eccentricities made him an endearing and likable character. The show also called back to detective stories from another era. Bucking the recent trend of detectives who solve murders using fantastic tech, Monk followed clues and used his intellect to crack every case he came across. For fans of current detective shows who missed it… you should definitely check out this gem from the aughts.



#2: “Chuck” (2007-12)


This fresh take on spy shows featured Zachary Levi as the titular character, a brilliant but under-motivated twenty-something who has a supercomputer downloaded into his brain. The supercomputer, known as the intersect, makes Chuck a valuable asset, and so he begins working with CIA Agent Sarah Walker and NSA Major John Casey. The show deftly balanced spy thriller elements with emotional plotlines involving Chuck’s double life. As the show went on critical acclaim grew, but viewership declined - mostly due to major competition in its time slot. Nevertheless devoted fans helped the series achieve renewal multiple seasons in a row, culminating with a final fifth season.





#1: “Deadwood” (2004-06)


Westerns may have fallen out of fashion decades ago, but this often overlooked gem from HBO is considered by many to be one the greatest western TV shows ever. Sadly, far too many people have no recollection of it. Airing on premium cable, “Deadwood” had the freedom to be as violent and gritty as the old west, something the show took full advantage of. Based on and set in the town of Deadwood, South Dakota in the 1870s, it used historical figures and events as inspiration for the series. Regrettably HBO decided not to renew “Deadwood” after its third season, ending it tragically short.

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